TABLE OF CONTENTS


1. INTRODUCTION

2. INTO ACTION

3. ECOLOGY & RESTORATION

4. INVASIVES & BEYOND

INVASIVE PLANTS
GLOSSARY
INVASIVE CATALOGUE
NATIVE PLANTS

5. WRAPPING UP

Native Plants We Want to See


After reviewing all the plants that we want to remove from the Refuge, you may begin to feel there will not be much left when you are done. However, the Refuge is full of many beautiful wild plants that provide valuable food and habitat for birds and other wildlife.

Wild rice is an annual aquatic grass with significant ecological value. It is best known for the nutritious seed it produces which is a favored food of many species of waterfowl.

It attracts rails, red-winged blackbirds and other species of birds in the fall and provides good cover for waterfowl and other wetland birds. It also provides food for muskrats, deer and other herbivores.

Wild rice has other ecological values as well, helping to maintain wetland water quality by tying up nutrients and stabilizing loose soils.


New York Ironweed is a common perennial wildflower on the refuge. It is very attractive to pollinators.

Black Eyed Susans are a food source for songbirds, butterflies and beneficial insects.

Blue Vervain is a food source for butterflies, songbirds, waterfowl and small mammals.

Pickerel weed provides shelter for waterfowl; especially juveniles, and is a good food source for small mammals and water fowl.

These are just a few of the hundreds of native plant species we hope to encourage on the refuge for the enrichment of the vital wildlife habitat JHNWR provides to the numerous mammals, reptiles, fish, amphibians and birds that live here or depend upon the resources here during their annual migrations.

NEXT:  SAFETY IN THE FIELD

Photo credits: William Buchanan/FWS; Lori Weingartner/FWS; Brendalee Philips/FWS; Brendalee Philips/FWS; Ned Connelly.